Memphis Art Park:
an arts & culture center
on our downtown riverfront

Inspired by Churchʼs Park & Auditorium, Memphis Art Park (MAP) would help nurture and invigorate the innovative and soulful creativity that is inherent to the DNA of Memphis. 

Destined for downtown, MAP envisions: (i) renovating the Cossitt Library at Front and Monroe into an arts center for film, music, performing arts, and dance; (ii) replacing the neighboring parking garage with an art park atop an underground garage; and (iii) converting the adjacent fire station into a visual art center.

MAP would

  • create a community arts center and public art park on the river bluff;
  • incubate, empower, and showcase our city’s emerging filmmakers, musicians, dancers, performing artists, visual artists, and other talents;
  • serve as a collaborative forum for local artists, arts groups & entrepreneurs;
  • congregate and connect on its “campus” a variety of arts-focused entities whose common mission is artist support and development;
  • provide arts education and community outreach programs for children +  
  • offer a dynamic downtown destination to enjoy our city’s arts & culture.

Share our vision. To download the presentation, click the MAP pic (above right). 

Become a Facebook fan. Join MAP's email list. Make it happen Memphis.

* Designs by the University of Memphis: Roy Beauchamp and Mario Walker.

Mayor Wharton cited Memphis Art Park in his 2009 mayoral platform

Memphis Arts and Culture Plan
No city in America has a richer culture than Memphis, and city government must lead the development of a plan to leverage our arts and culture into a competitive advantage. Most of all, the Wharton Administration will develop the connectivity that is now missing and results in unconnected amenities and attractions. Some of the elements of this plan could include Memphis Art Park, expansion of the National Civil Rights Museum, the South Forum development, and Triangle Noir.

Memphis Art Park on Facebook

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

  
Investing in a Memphis Renaissance by providing arts facilities, resources, and visibility for emerging filmmakers, musicians, performing artists, dancers, and visual artists